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Sometimes when the grass seems greener, you get closer and realize it’s just fertilized with different manure. 

At the beginning of this year, I left the safe harbor of a company where I had built a career for the open water of a growing company that wanted my help to breathe new life into their training program.   The leadership changed within my first month in the role, and the future vision I had signed up for no longer existed.  Suffice it to say, I was disappointed to not get the opportunity to build a program from the ground up, let alone dealing with the micromanagement and 180 degree change in direction from the new leader.  

It would have been really easy to be discouraged, and to be honest, I was for a time.  I spent a few days really bummed with myself; how could I have walked away from a job I loved for so long, just to find an organization where on the best days I had an hour of job satisfaction?  Eventually I realized I was mourning a job that didn’t really exist anymore.  My beloved manager had left a month or so before I did at my previous job, the role had continued to evolve and the group I supported only had one or two (out of dozens) leaders still around.  That realization helped me determine that I didn’t necessarily make a mistake in leaving, but that didn’t mean I had to stay, so my job search began in late April.  

As the next opportunities began to appear, I realized I needed to be more thoughtful and intentional in my career decisions.  Asking better questions in the interview process and understanding the short and longer term goals of an organization were now much more important.  After a former leader shared an opening at her company – a large employer in our city that many former coworkers now call home, and the experience with the recruiter and hiring manager created a confidence in this being the right spot for me.  I received a generous job offer from them in June, turning down a couple of other opportunities in the works, and started in mid-July.  

From the moment I walked in the door on my first day, I’ve been overwhelmed by the kindness and team spirit by those on my team and in the office.  After primarily working from home for the past four years, I’m spending more time in a local office, working with teammates around the globe.  

I’m so grateful to call this place home, and to build the next phase of my career here. 



That greener grass…

Wednesday, August 1, 2018



Sometimes when the grass seems greener, you get closer and realize it’s just fertilized with different manure. 

At the beginning of this year, I left the safe harbor of a company where I had built a career for the open water of a growing company that wanted my help to breathe new life into their training program.   The leadership changed within my first month in the role, and the future vision I had signed up for no longer existed.  Suffice it to say, I was disappointed to not get the opportunity to build a program from the ground up, let alone dealing with the micromanagement and 180 degree change in direction from the new leader.  

It would have been really easy to be discouraged, and to be honest, I was for a time.  I spent a few days really bummed with myself; how could I have walked away from a job I loved for so long, just to find an organization where on the best days I had an hour of job satisfaction?  Eventually I realized I was mourning a job that didn’t really exist anymore.  My beloved manager had left a month or so before I did at my previous job, the role had continued to evolve and the group I supported only had one or two (out of dozens) leaders still around.  That realization helped me determine that I didn’t necessarily make a mistake in leaving, but that didn’t mean I had to stay, so my job search began in late April.  

As the next opportunities began to appear, I realized I needed to be more thoughtful and intentional in my career decisions.  Asking better questions in the interview process and understanding the short and longer term goals of an organization were now much more important.  After a former leader shared an opening at her company – a large employer in our city that many former coworkers now call home, and the experience with the recruiter and hiring manager created a confidence in this being the right spot for me.  I received a generous job offer from them in June, turning down a couple of other opportunities in the works, and started in mid-July.  

From the moment I walked in the door on my first day, I’ve been overwhelmed by the kindness and team spirit by those on my team and in the office.  After primarily working from home for the past four years, I’m spending more time in a local office, working with teammates around the globe.  

I’m so grateful to call this place home, and to build the next phase of my career here. 




Just over twelve years ago, I interviewed for an entry-level job I didn't think I wanted.  When I was offered the job, I figured I'd work there for a couple months until I figured out what I really wanted to do when I grew up.  That job was filled with opportunities and with hard work and luck, that job turned into a career as I figured out 'what I really wanted to do' without having to grow up too much.

In many ways, I did grow up in that company.  Personally and professionally; I entered as a 21-year-old who was lacking direction in life, and earlier this year I left as a 33-year-old professional who helped build a world-class team around the globe.  So many of my friendships were made there over the past decade.  Almost all of my 400+ flights, I owe to my employer.  They sent me around the globe, trusted me with projects before they were public knowledge, and gave me an opportunity to flourish.  I relocated a couple times, purchased a house, and built a life thanks, in part, to my career.

My next opportunity landed at my doorstep thanks to some kind words from a dear friend to the company's CEO.  I'm excited to bring my skills and experience to this growing company and will forever be grateful for the opportunities given to me since 2005.

The Next Big Adventure

Friday, March 23, 2018


Just over twelve years ago, I interviewed for an entry-level job I didn't think I wanted.  When I was offered the job, I figured I'd work there for a couple months until I figured out what I really wanted to do when I grew up.  That job was filled with opportunities and with hard work and luck, that job turned into a career as I figured out 'what I really wanted to do' without having to grow up too much.

In many ways, I did grow up in that company.  Personally and professionally; I entered as a 21-year-old who was lacking direction in life, and earlier this year I left as a 33-year-old professional who helped build a world-class team around the globe.  So many of my friendships were made there over the past decade.  Almost all of my 400+ flights, I owe to my employer.  They sent me around the globe, trusted me with projects before they were public knowledge, and gave me an opportunity to flourish.  I relocated a couple times, purchased a house, and built a life thanks, in part, to my career.

My next opportunity landed at my doorstep thanks to some kind words from a dear friend to the company's CEO.  I'm excited to bring my skills and experience to this growing company and will forever be grateful for the opportunities given to me since 2005.


This post may contain affiliate links.

My recent travel to Tempe, Arizona has resulted in dozens of flights in and out of Phoenix' Sky Harbor Airport.  They may have been rated America's Friendliest Airport, but the 18-minute shuttle ride to and from the rental car facility leaves me feeling anything but friendly.  Rental cars can be expensive; mine have averaged between $270-330 (plus gas and parking) on recent trips, so I decided to run a little experiment - is it cheaper to use rideshare services like Uber or Lyft?

I chose Lyft after hearing NPR's How I Built This interview with John Zimmer, the founder of Lyft.  I loved the story of Lyft, and the more I've read about their company culture and how they treat employees and contractors, the more I wanted to support them.


So how much did I spend on Lyft my October 9th-12th trip to Arizona?

Monday
  • Home to the DSM Airport - $15.16 plus $4 cash tip (this included a stop at my husband's office to say goodbye)
  • PHX to the hotel - $15.28 plus $2 tip
  • Hotel shuttle to nearby shopping center for pedicure and dinner - Free! plus $4 cash tip
  • Hotel shuttle from dinner to the hotel - Free!  Plus $5 cash tip
Tuesday
  • Hotel to Office - $6.43 plus $2 cash tip
  • Office to Hotel - $6.52 plus $3 cash tip
  • Dinner - delivered to hotel
Wednesday
  • Hotel to Office - $6.31 plus $2 tip
  • Office to Hotel - $6.56 plus $5 cash tip (she was an awesome driver)
  • Dinner - walked to dinner at nearby Tempe Marketplace and used the hotel's free shuttle to get back plus $5 cash tip
Thursday
  • Hotel to Office - $7.93 plus $1 tip, this also included a pit stop at Chick-fil-a for breakfast on my way to work.  
  • Office to Airport - $9.32 plus $5 cash tip

I should note that my hotel offers a free shuttle within 5 miles of the property, and I could coordinate ahead of time to have free transportation to and from the office.  But that would require advance planning and possibly stops along the way as other guests are dropped off.

Rideshare total: $106.51
Rental estimate: $251.22 + $25 gas = $276.22
Savings: $169.71

Pros - I got to meet some nice people who know the city, and had some great conversations.  One woman had just picked up a rental car as part of a Lyft rental program, and it was great hearing how excited she was for her new car.  I talked to several people who enjoy driving for Lyft because they can work around caring for their kids or drive part-time in addition to their full-time job.
Cons - not every driver is a good driver, but Lyft's rating system ensures any driver I've rated a 3 or below won't be matched with me again.  Twice I had to wait up to 15 minutes for a ride, so now I'm scheduling Lyft's during prime time (to and from work)

Using a rideshare service like Lyft saved my employer some money, and also saved me the headache of the rental car shuttle.  The first week using Lyft, I limited myself to restaurants near my hotel, so for week two, I'll venture out a bit more and see if the savings still make sense!

Never tried Lyft?  Click here for $5 off your first ride - or more!

Rental Car vs. Rideshare

Tuesday, October 17, 2017


This post may contain affiliate links.

My recent travel to Tempe, Arizona has resulted in dozens of flights in and out of Phoenix' Sky Harbor Airport.  They may have been rated America's Friendliest Airport, but the 18-minute shuttle ride to and from the rental car facility leaves me feeling anything but friendly.  Rental cars can be expensive; mine have averaged between $270-330 (plus gas and parking) on recent trips, so I decided to run a little experiment - is it cheaper to use rideshare services like Uber or Lyft?

I chose Lyft after hearing NPR's How I Built This interview with John Zimmer, the founder of Lyft.  I loved the story of Lyft, and the more I've read about their company culture and how they treat employees and contractors, the more I wanted to support them.


So how much did I spend on Lyft my October 9th-12th trip to Arizona?

Monday
  • Home to the DSM Airport - $15.16 plus $4 cash tip (this included a stop at my husband's office to say goodbye)
  • PHX to the hotel - $15.28 plus $2 tip
  • Hotel shuttle to nearby shopping center for pedicure and dinner - Free! plus $4 cash tip
  • Hotel shuttle from dinner to the hotel - Free!  Plus $5 cash tip
Tuesday
  • Hotel to Office - $6.43 plus $2 cash tip
  • Office to Hotel - $6.52 plus $3 cash tip
  • Dinner - delivered to hotel
Wednesday
  • Hotel to Office - $6.31 plus $2 tip
  • Office to Hotel - $6.56 plus $5 cash tip (she was an awesome driver)
  • Dinner - walked to dinner at nearby Tempe Marketplace and used the hotel's free shuttle to get back plus $5 cash tip
Thursday
  • Hotel to Office - $7.93 plus $1 tip, this also included a pit stop at Chick-fil-a for breakfast on my way to work.  
  • Office to Airport - $9.32 plus $5 cash tip

I should note that my hotel offers a free shuttle within 5 miles of the property, and I could coordinate ahead of time to have free transportation to and from the office.  But that would require advance planning and possibly stops along the way as other guests are dropped off.

Rideshare total: $106.51
Rental estimate: $251.22 + $25 gas = $276.22
Savings: $169.71

Pros - I got to meet some nice people who know the city, and had some great conversations.  One woman had just picked up a rental car as part of a Lyft rental program, and it was great hearing how excited she was for her new car.  I talked to several people who enjoy driving for Lyft because they can work around caring for their kids or drive part-time in addition to their full-time job.
Cons - not every driver is a good driver, but Lyft's rating system ensures any driver I've rated a 3 or below won't be matched with me again.  Twice I had to wait up to 15 minutes for a ride, so now I'm scheduling Lyft's during prime time (to and from work)

Using a rideshare service like Lyft saved my employer some money, and also saved me the headache of the rental car shuttle.  The first week using Lyft, I limited myself to restaurants near my hotel, so for week two, I'll venture out a bit more and see if the savings still make sense!

Never tried Lyft?  Click here for $5 off your first ride - or more!

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